from89:

Prosperity by Caroline Cheng

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emmasdisneyworld:

agusmclennon:

Corpse Bride behind the camera

this will always be the most incredible type of film making to me

(via ceruvial-brooks)

oxane:

Chrissie Macdonald,'The Haunting', New York Times Magazine. 
How Asian horror films put the fear back into America’s scary movies.
Photography by John Short

oxane:

Chrissie Macdonald,'The Haunting', New York Times Magazine

How Asian horror films put the fear back into America’s scary movies.

Photography by John Short

(via f1evre)

sci-universe:

Details of the Hubble (Ultra) Deep Field.  You’re looking approximately 13 billion years back in time.

(via ceruvial-brooks)

instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home

For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.

In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

dogma-art:

 Andy Warhol’s  Factory  situation. The vibe of  downtown New York in the 70’s, a pop vision becoming real… 

vintagegal:

Disneyland c. late 1950s- mid-1960s

(via ceruvial-brooks)

"I remember reading something Paul Thomas Anderson said, that you can often feel betrayed by films, because you’ve seen this moment dramatized before in a film, and I guess that’s what the moment in Magnolia where Philip Seymour Hoffman says, “This is part of the movie where you help someone out” is about. There’s no way of putting the genie back in the bottle, that kind of awareness of dramatized moments; you can’t erase it. In the most horrific circumstances of natural disaster, one of the main things that people are saying, “God, it looks like a film.” The moments when you should feel the most connected to things, there’s this awful, dissonant, alienating thing that occurs. I think that’s slightly what Oliver’s suffering from. He almost can’t take moments seriously, because he’s seen them before. To me, that seemed interesting, and isn’t done that much. Scream kind of did it. I think those first two Scream films are incredible, and The Faculty. There’s a real pocket of brilliant writing that Kevin Williamson did in the first season of Dawson’s Creek, which I loved. I really loved Kevin Williamson.” -Richard Ayoade

(via ceruvial-brooks)

downrabbitholes:

'Alice in a Labyrinth' is an Alice In Wonderland themed restaurant in the Ginza entertainment district of Tokyo, Japan. The maids are all dressed like Alice and the food and drinks are all themed (with a mixture of Japanese & western dining options). The appetizers come served on chessboards and the drinks are served in 'drink me' potion bottles. There are bunny tails on the chairs and there's even a Mad Hatter tea room. In the bottom picture, you can see the menu opens up into a miniature room scenery (remember the part when Alice grew into a giant? It feels like that). If you go to Japan and decide to check it out, here is their official website with directions. Photo credits 1234 & 5.

(via acuriousidea)